Happy Spring, Time for music

Making a Valentine Song for your Sweetie!

by Robert McNally January 25, 2017

Making a Valentine Song for your Sweetie!

Lets face it, there are few things more heartwarming and romantic than making a song for someone you love. Music is evocative, intangible, and a little risky, just like Love is.

In this article, we are going to show you how you can make sweet little melodies, a musical treat for someone you love. 

We have a video and a page about Songlets, which are short phrases that are very easy to make up, and are nice coherent little bits of music. Putting several Songlets together can make a song, and you can do it! Here is our Valentine Song Template!

Phrase 1 Pattern: X X X X  Y Y Y Y  X X X X  Z Z X X

Choose a fret number (on 1st string) for X  (lets say fret #2)
Choose a fret number (on 1st string) for Y (lets say fret #4
Choose a fret number (on 1st string) for Z (lets say fret #1)

That would be 2 2 2 2  4 4 4 4  2 2 2 2  1 1 2 2 ( each note a downstrum)
Write this sequence down. Hear Phrase One

You could start with these notes, or choose your own notes on the first string. This is Phrase One.

Phrase 2 Pattern:    X X X X  Y Y Y Y  Z Z Z Z  W W W W

(pick a new X, Y Z, and a W, maybe 3, 5, 6, 1)
3 3 3 3  5 5 5 5  7 7 7 7  1 1 1 1 
Write this sequence down. Hear Phrase Two

Phrase 3 Pattern: X X Y Y  X X Z Z   Y Y Y Y  W W W X 

(pick a new X, Y Z, and a W, how about Z=4, Y=5, Z=6, W=1) 
4 4 5 5  4 4 6 6  5 5 5 5  1 1 1 4
Write it down... Hear Phrase Three

Repeat Phrase 1 (for Phrase 4)   X X X X  Y Y Y Y  X X X X  Z Z X X
2 2 2 2  4 4 4 4  2 2 2 2  1 1 2 2
Write it down... Hear Phrase Four

Here is our song, all notes on first string, one downstrum each note

2 2 2 2  4 4 4 4  2 2 2 2  1 1 2 2

3 3 3 3  5 5 5 5  7 7 7 7  1 1 1 1

4 4 5 5  4 4 7 7  5 5 5 5  1 1 1 4

2 2 2 2  4 4 4 4  2 2 2 2  1 1 2 2

Now: Substitute your own fret choices for X, Y, Z, and W in each phrase, whatever you choose. Fret 0 (open) is allowed too! Experiment!
Write it down, rehearse it a few times, and perform it on Valentines day! Or record it as a voice memo and send it by message or email. Be sure to rehearse it, you will likely be nervous when you play it. That's OK... Love and Music are both risky, because you care!

If you want to get a bit more complex, Here are a couple of tips:

1. You could change the Phrase Patterns or repeat them, or change their order.

2. You could choose a note on the 2nd or 3rd string. Keep in mind the bigger the jump in pitch, the less two notes seem "connected", so if it feels too big a jump, try a different note.

3. You could add some upstrums (in between the downstrums) once in a while to make the rhythm more lively (see short video about adding upstrums)

4. For a real spice, remove your finger from the string when you do an upstrum (adding a 0 fret note just for the upstrum)

5. Ready for more challenge? Use a Minichord on some of the melody notes you wrote to get a changing harmony (see video on MiniChords Part 1).

Congratulations! Simply playing your melody you made for your Valentine will be great, but if you are feeling really romantic and want to go even deeper;

The Bonus Round:  Write some loving words to your melody. 
 You don't have to have a word (or sylable) for every note you strum, and you can repeat syllables ( You-ou...).

Here are some good romantic elements, but caution: make it real, make it from your heart, nothing falls flatter than romantic sentiments that aren't really felt. Go for it, remember, Love is Risky!

How you feel about them.
Beautiful things they remind you of.
Challenges you have faced together.
How you really feel about them.
Dreams for have of your future together.
How you feel about them.

If you go for the words (and you should!) remember the Warning: make your words real for you. And you really ought to make up your own melody (not the same as our demo here)... your Valentine may be working from this article too!

Happy Valentines Day! 



Robert McNally
Robert McNally

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